Article 46

Amending The Constitution

Official Literal English translation

Article 46.1

AMENDING THE CONSTITUTION
It is permitted to amend any provision of this Constitution, by change or by addition or by repeal, in the manner provided by this Article.

46.2 Every proposal to amend this Constitution (it) must be initiated in Dáil Éireann as a Bill, and when it is passed or deemed passed by both Houses of the Oireachtas it must be submitted to the people for determination by Referendum in accordance with the law which will be in force as regards the Referendum at the time.

46.5 Any Bill in which there will be a proposal to amend this Constitution the President must immediately put his hand to it, when he has been satisfied that the provisions of this Article were fulfilled regarding it and that the people
duly consented to that proposal in accordance with the provisions of section 1 of Article 47 of this Constitution, and the President must duly promulgate it as a law.

Points to Consider:

Article 46

"Every proposal to amend this Constitution (it) must be initiated in Dáil Éireann as a Bill, and when it is passed or deemed passed by both Houses of the Oireachtas it must be submitted to the people for determination by Referendum in accordance with the law which will be in force as regards the Referendum at the time."

1st Amendment - 1st point of fraud as it doesn't meet the criteria outlined in An Bunreacht 1937 articles 25, article 8 and article 63

2nd Amendment took place on May 30th 1941 with the aim of "tidying up the Articles" of The National Constitution of Éire, An Bunreacht Na hÉireann. It removed Articles 51 - 63 conclusively, and the 50 Articles that were published later on the 25th March 1942, in the next version of The Constitution had a greater number words for 50 Articles than the previous 63 Articles combined. The definition of tidying up is to take away or remove, which was not what happened.

"In a memo to the Attorney General on 2 June 1976, the Secretary of the Department of the Taoiseach stated that amendments to the original Irish version involved the introduction of new Irish text in 76 Parliamentary Debates, Vol. xcvi, col. 2074. A study of the Irish text Staidéar ar an téacs Gaeilge 25 practically one-third of the Articles of the Constitution – in Articles 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 34 and 40. The additions varied from two sections (ten subsections) plus six words (Article 25), a section and three subsections plus 18 words (Art. 34), a section, a subsection and twenty-nine words (Art. 27), a section (Art. 24), four subsections (Art. 40), a subsection and sixty-eight words (Art. 26), a subsection (Art. 29) and, in the other nine Articles, additional words ranging from one hundred and thirty-seven (Art. 28) to one (Art. 11). Since then many more amendments have been made to the Constitution, a total of nine having been added in the nineties – three in 1992, one in 1995, 1996 and 1997, two in 1998 and one in 1999. The Nineteenth Amendment of the Constitution, 1998, contains five new subsections which include two whole new Articles and a new section. Quite apart from the fact that these amendments have been passed by the people in roman script, and were subsequently enrolled in Gaelic script, and quite apart from the question of these amendments being in the modern standard spelling, appearing alongside the older spelling in the enrolled text, which questions will be discussed below, there is in the author’s opinion the much more serious question of the divergences of terminology between these amendments and the original text and the fact that these amendments are to a great extent direct translations of an English text as against the main body of the text into which they are being incorporated which, as this study seeks to illustrate, is not a direct translation of the English text."


Second Amendment of the Constitution Act, 1941

https://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/1941/ca/2/enacted/en/html